Hoovers Efforts Were Not Effective Enough

During this time of economic crisis, Franklin Delano Roosevelt was the president who started programs through the New Deal in which was meant for an economic recovery in the United States. FDR’s New Deal was a great idea except for the Supreme Court cases that arose due to problems in certain programs started. The New Deal all started with Franklin D. Roosevelt when he attempted to re-boost the economic crisis in America during The Great Depression. He was born in born in Hyde Park, New York on January 30, 1882 at his family’s country estate in the midst of the rolling hills and rural majesty of the Hudson Valley. Franklin was the son of James Roosevelt and his second wife, Sara Delano. He also had a half-brother twenty-six years his senior. Other than that, he had no other siblings. He goes by the nickname of “FDR” which is short for Franklin Delano Roosevelt and is known throughout time as the president for life.

We Can Write Custom Essays about FDR for You! While in his serving in his presidency, came the horrifying time known as the Great Depression. The Great Depression caused many problems with the economy. The divorce rate which would be likely to increase actually went down because couples could not afford to abode in separate households. Also, others who were planning on getting married postponed their wedding plans due to a lack of economic funding. Unemployed men felt like failures when they could not support their families and lost their class when they saw their wives and children working. These wives and kids were working to the point where they were too ashamed to get help from friends or family. Women were blamed for taking the jobs of men and in 1931 when the Federation of Labor endorsed it. President Hoover’s philosophy on the depression was that he believed that it was caused by problems with the United States economy and that the problems were beyond any control of the U.S. He thought that the key to economic recovery was confidence in the economy.

Factories and businesses tried to maintain confidence, and even as they shut down, Hoover continued to insist that recovery was on its way. He called for a steady payment of higher wages or workers to keep the economy stable and it worked for a while until these industries had to start making pay cuts on the workers salaries. He had many business leaders promise to keep the worker’s wages reasonable and steady and when this didn’t work, they all blamed his attitude for the depression. Feeling the pressure, he finally began to act. The government then created more jobs, built new public buildings, roads, parks, and dams. A Presidents Emergency Committee on Employment had recommended local relief programs. The Hawley-Smoot tariff was passed by Congress in 1930 to protect domestic industries from foreign competitors. The tariffs backfired against America when European nations countered them by raising their tariffs on American goods from Europe. Hoover set up the Reconstruction Finance Corporation (RFC) in 1932, which gave the banks government credit so that they could extend the loans to the people.

Although the people disagreed with this idea with the thoughts that it gave more wealth to the bankers and not the people themselves. Hoovers efforts were not effective enough. He wanted the state and local governments to handle the recovery but they did not have enough money in their programs. The first program created was the Emergency Banking Act which On March 6, 1993 he shut down all of the banks in the nation which gave the government the opportunity to inspect the health of all banks. This program worked as it reestablished American faith in banks. Americans weren’t afraid that they would lose all of their savings due to a bank failure. One of the other programs he made was the Home Owners Loan Corporation and the Agriculture Adjustment Administration. This was to help people keep their houses. The outcome of this was farmers killed off certain animals and crops as they told to by the AAA. Many could not believe that the federal government was condoning such as action when many Americans were starving.