Proofreading corrects run-on sentences. Run-on sentences occur due to lack of punctuation and happen when you become lost in your   essay … you are wholly focused on your task at hand, so you keep going and going, to  get  all of those important pieces of information out. If run-on sentences are not corrected, the meaning can be lost as the reader has to stop and unpack what it is you are trying to articulate. This is a normal part of the writing process, as are run-on sentences. The trick is to be able to identify them so that you can add grammar and condense as needed. Essentially a run-on sentence has two or more independent clauses and lacks the appropriate conjunction or grammar mark between them. A run-on sentence looks like this:

You know when you really want to make a point about something and you are unsure whether or not the punctuation goes here or it goes there and you feel that if you end the sentence it will not pack a punch and the whole crux of your  essay  rides on this one sentence and you are unsure whether or not to use a quote?

You can break it up by using grammar. A rule of thumb that many academics use when  writing  an  essay  is to keep the amount of ands to a minimum. If you look above you will see that the sentence uses four ands – at times that is fine, but try to read that sentence without pausing… it runs on and on and on. It can be easily fixed by throwing in a few commas, full-stops, and semi-colons. Watch this:

You know when you really want to make a point about something? Yet you are unsure whether or not the punctuation goes here, or there, and you feel that if you end the sentence that it will not pack a punch; thus the whole crux of your  essay  rides on this one sentence. You are also unsure whether or not to use a quote.

However, run-on sentences do not need to run on down a page, they can be as simple as:

* I saw a teacher who cares.

* What does that mean? Perhaps the writer may have wanted to say:

* I saw a teacher. Who cares!

* I saw a teacher, who cares.

* Here is another example:

* She loved travelling in Italy she felt Rome was too hot.

* The following are correct:

* She loved travelling in Italy. She felt Rome was too hot.

* She loved travelling in Italy; she felt Rome was too hot.

* She loved travelling in Italy; however, she felt Rome was too hot.

As you can see there are no solid rules that you need to adhere in order to construct good and proper sentences, there are many correct ways that you can punctuate sentences to convey accurate meaning. Proofreading will highlight any run-ons that you may make and correct them for you.

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