Essay topics are the crucial part for your college admission and also for your academic career. And choosing the appropriate topic is as important as writing a quality essay. It should not have any mistakes and must be well written and presented. The essay topics should have a matured look and the content should have proper usage of grammar and words. It is one of the most difficult tasks to choose an essay topic for the college admission. Most students feel that the essay topics must be extravagant or unusual. Basis this, they choose topics which are not within their grasp or knowledge. But, actually the admission board does not look into this aspect, they look for the person in you and what are your qualities. The essay topic can be very general, but the quality and content of the essay must reflect your intellect and personality. The essay topic can be general in nature, but must be interesting and captivating at the same time, so that it can garner the attention of the admission board.

When you choose the essay topics, think if you can say something interesting through it. Understand that the admission board will be reading hundreds of essays and they will give attention to your essay if it sounds interesting. Essay topics, in general and especially for the college admissions give insights about your personality and connects you to the board. How you have shaped in last few years? What issues makes you think? These are the few questions that give a personal touch to the essay topic and the essay as a whole. Moreover, essay writing is theme based writing and is depended upon sufficient research and in-depth analysis. An essay topic on the advancement of science is a rather general and factual based essay. However, the essay topic on your experience in the trekking expedition will give an insight about you as a person. The essay will be a way of telling the admission committee about a thing or two about your personality and character, which otherwise will not be reflected from your grade paper or resume. Essay topics can also be of both literary and non-literary types. The literary essays cover mostly the essays on the literature books, periodicals and journals. As for non-literary type essays the essay topics vary from music, film and photography. Also, can be included essays on visual arts comprising of sculpture or drawing. For a photographic essay the scope lies with the series of photographs. Choosing and essay topic and writing it can be a art which can be developed over a period of time. With experience one can make it into a prosperous career path with potential of lucrative income.

The American History Essay Contest was established to encourage young people to think creatively about our nation’s great history and learn about history in a new light. This contest is open to students in public, private, and parochial schools, and registered home-study programs. Students in grades five through eight are encouraged to participate. Each year, a selected topic for use during the academic year is announced, and contest instructions are published online and sent to schools by participating DAR chapters. Essays are judged for historical accuracy, adherence to the topic, organization of materials, interest, originality, spelling, grammar, punctuation, and neatness. Participating chapters send one winning essay from each of the four grades for judging on the state level. The state will send one winning essay from each of the four grades to be judged on a divisional level. The winning essay from each of the four grades will then be judged on the national level and the winners are announced. Each student participant receives a certificate of participation from the chapter and the chapter winners receive bronze medals and certificates. State winners receive certificates and silver medals.

National winners receive special certificates, medals, and a monetary award. Click here for an informational PDF handout. For additional contest information or guidelines, please contact your local DAR chapter. DAR partnered with the National Italian American Foundation (NIAF) in 1996 to sponsor an annual national essay contest in honor of Christopher Columbus. The contest is open to students in grades nine through twelve. Each year the DAR and the NIAF agree upon a topic for use during the academic year, and contest instructions are published online and sent to the schools by participating DAR chapters. Essays are judged for historical accuracy, adherence to the topic, organization of materials, interest, originality, spelling, grammar, punctuation, and neatness. Judging at the national level is supervised by the NIAF. One winning essay from all those submitted is sent from the participating chapters for judging on the state level. The state will send one winning essay to be judged on the division level. The winning essay from each division is then judged on the national level and the winner is announced. Second- and third-place winning essays are selected on the national level. Each student participant receives a certificate of participation from the chapter. The national prize is awarded by the NIAF. Click here for an informational PDF handout. For additional contest information or guidelines, please contact your local DAR chapter.

A series of steps, starting with developing a research question and working thesis, will lead you through writing a research paper. As you move through these steps and actually create the research paper, you may find that you can’t move through all of them in chronological order, and that’s o.k. In fact, you may change the order of the steps depending on the subject, your knowledge of the subject, and your sources. For example, sometimes you need to do just a bit of background research and reading before you can develop a research question. Sometimes you need to go back and find additional sources to corroborate your viewpoint. The research writing steps that we offer represent a general, ideal, movement through the research writing process. In reality, writers often repeat or circle back as needed. Hey, wait a minute. In our opinion, these steps represent the best way to move through the writing process because they ask you to think and develop a research question before you actually do a lot of research. The one big mess that you can get into, as a student, comes from doing too much unfocused research before identifying your own viewpoint, the one that you will eventually need to support. If you do too much unfocused research first, then the tendency is to try to include all of it in the paper. The result is a hodgepodge of information that’s not focused, developed fully, or indicative of your own thoughts. It’s also not efficient to do too much research before you really know what you’re looking for. Try it our way–develop that research question first–to cut out a lot of research paper mess. Questions or feedback about ESC’s Online Writing Center? Contact us at Learning.Support@esc.edu.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *