In each case, identify the argument’s two parts: what is the conclusion? (There may be more than one conclusion in the passage; this means that you could identify more than one argument per passage.) What is or are the premises? (Each premise and each conclusion should be formulated in your own words; each of them must be a simple and complete declarative sentence.)

In each case, identify the argument’s two parts: what is the conclusion? (There may be more than one conclusion in the passage; this means that you could identify more than one argument per passage.) What is or are the premises? (Each premise and each conclusion should be formulated in your own words; each of them must be a simple and complete declarative sentence.)

 

After you identify the argument, answer the following questions:

 

Is this a good argument? What’s misleading about it? Where is the reasoning mistake?

 

 

 

EXAMPLE 1

 

The following appeared in a local newspaper:

 

In the last school where Principal McArthur worked, he was known as very tough. The teachers resented him. Nobody liked him. He’d often call the teachers into his office and scold them for lateness, lazy work habits, and sloppy record-keeping. When Dr. McArthur arrives at his new position at the Willows High School next August, he will again create a hostile work environment.

 

 

 

EXAMPLE 2:

 

The following appeared in promotional literature for a billboard company:

 

Bye Bye Baby Store installed a large billboard on the side of the 95 highway exit. Sales of baby items in the store increased 13% in the next fiscal quarter. Dr. Mark Baldwin, a local dentist, would like to increase the profits of his dental practice. All that needs to be done is installing an advertising billboard next to a highway exist and his patient load will increase tremendously.